23:05

Recently I have had to commute to the Perth office over a couple of days to cover staff holidays, so I spent some time with friends in Dundee to cut down on travel time. During my car journeys I had time to reflect on my own development within my job as well as my self growth.

When I was first offered my position I was a fresh university graduate with little experience in the working environment. Almost two years later have passed since then and my responsibilities within the role have doubled (probably even tripled). Stressful times hit me every week and problems arise that need to be unpicked. Outside of work I often worry about not having enough time to complete a project, or fret over a stressful encounter at work. Stressful situations aside, I am very thankful to be in a workplace which appreciates my work and to work with like-minded individuals.

Never did I intend to find a job in this industry let alone still be within the same company (almost) two years later. Whilst it is important to provide a living for yourself, it is also important to enjoy your job (to an extent). If my job had been mind-numbingly repetitive and ‘soul-destroying’; I would have left a long time ago. I am thankful for colleagues who are encouraging and a pleasure to work with, and for a workplace which I feel comfortable in.

22:01

When I work an earlier shift I somehow feel fresher and more ready for work. I set my alarm for an earlier time and leave the house in time to catch the morning brightening up. My morning commute is relaxed and peaceful. I listen to upbeat music to wake myself up, and watch people get on with their morning routines. I am the first one to arrive at my office which gives me time to settle down before the hustle and bustle of the day.

I have never seen myself as a morning person but I have grown to allocate my night time for sleeping. The arrival of a new day is not the worst thing any more.

00:06

Working in a takeaway has taught me many things; one of which is tolerance.

The saying, ‘The customer is always right’ is only sometimes correct in the food industry. People feel entitled to free food, people can be rude and demanding, and people can complain like there is no tomorrow.

At the end of the day the business I work in consists of 3 people: my uncle, my aunty and I. I take the orders (either over the phone or in person), give these to my aunt and uncle in the kitchen, and they cook the food. I receive money from the customers, then help pack the food up in the kitchen, and bring the food to the customer. When there are delivery orders my aunty drives there herself leaving only my uncle and I in the shop. It is a small business and is family run. When I am not available to help them out; my cousin works. The business is lacking in staff but we get by.

Thus I find it frustrating when people do not seem to appreciate the hard work that is put into providing (what seems to them to be a simple) service.

Of course I cannot express my annoyance or frustrations at the customers but need to internalise these thoughts. I have learnt to tolerate people who may act rudely and not let others’ misdemeanours affect my service. Luckily there are more pleasant customers than unpleasant, who appreciate the time and efforts put into preparing and making their food. As with any job there comes a learning process, and learning to tolerate customers is a valuable skill which will benefit me in the future.